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Showing posts from December, 2007

Righto, love: A whole lot of deducting going on | www.tucsoncitizen.com ®

Righto, love: A whole lot of deducting going on www.tucsoncitizen.com ® : Righto, love: A whole lot of deducting going on CHUCK GRAHAM Published: 12.06.2007 What will it be? Revenge or forgiveness? Seeking revenge surely makes for better theater. Check out the mind games in "The Business of Murder" by Richard Harris. This ingenious whodunit shifts into a howdunit before reaching its resolution as a whydunit. Invisible Theatre has turned to secular counter-programming for the holidays by coming up with this crisp production directed by James Blair. The subject is murder, but the active ingredient is cleverness. If you love to watch a good mystery unfold onstage, if you enjoy staying at least one jump ahead of the playwright, this show is for you. It is written in the grand old tradition of Agatha Christie, with a whole lot of deducting going on. The story takes place in London, in the relatively modern time of 1981. The one-room set does include a telly that is turned on

IT's 'The Business of Murder' is an impeccable play

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Tucson Weekly : Arts : Intriguing Theater PUBLISHED ON DECEMBER 6, 2007: Intriguing Theater IT's 'The Business of Murder' is an impeccable play By JAMES REEL As audience members take their seats before the start of The Business of Murder at Invisible Theatre, Bernard Herrmann's music for various Alfred Hitchcock movies plays in the background. This is an important clue: Hitchcock was a master of psychological thrillers, not Agatha Christie-style whodunits, and it's a psychological duel that's about to play out on the IT stage. The Business of Murder is a 1981 play by Richard Harris, not the late actor but a prolific British television writer who specialized in crime and detective teleplays. TV shows can open up and go on location, but plays are necessarily limited in their settings, unless the producers have a large budget or a very imaginative director and audience. Harris makes the most of the constricted theater, capitalizing on the claustrophobic atmo

Mitchell is a must-see in Invisible Theatre's whodunit | www.azstarnet.com ®

Mitchell is a must-see in Invisible Theatre's whodunit www.azstarnet.com ® : Published: 11.30.2007 Mitchell is a must-see in Invisible Theatre's whodunit By Kathleen Allen ARIZONA DAILY STAR Pay attention. Pay very close attention. In the first scene of the first act of "The Business of Murder," which Invisible Theatre opened Wednesday, about everything you need to know to solve the mystery is revealed to you. Still, we're willing to bet you'll miss it. That's what makes this genre, and this Richard Harris play, so much fun — it keeps you guessing, even as the clues are hidden in plain view. The play — which IT first staged 17 years ago — is a pretty standard cat-and-mouse story. Mr. Stone lures the detective, Hallett, to his apartment under false pretenses. And he lures Dee, the married Hallett's lover, there, too. It seems he's setting them up, but for what? And why? Playing Stone is Douglas Mitchell, who is fairly new to the Old Pueb